Fishing Talbot Reservoir Guide At Evansford

Fishing Talbot Reservoir

Welcome to the Fishing Talbot Reservoir Guide. Talbot Reservoir is located at Evansford in Victoria.

In this fishing guide we will go over what bait and lures you might use and some useful information about the reservoir.

This article has plenty of pictures below, so you can get an idea for some top fishing spots around the lake.

Trout jumping out of water on fly rod

Above image: Rainbow trout jumping out of water. Caught on a fly rod with a black muddler minnow.

Fishing at Talbot Reservoir can produce mixed results on and off, but the scenery is lovely and it is a nice secluded place that doesn’t get a lot anglers.

Talbot Reservoir is stocked with brown trout and rainbow intermittently by the VFA (Victorian Fishing Authority.) The trout are subject to stocking, depending on water levels and conditions.

Most of the lake is accessible when the water levels are good.

West side of Talbot Reservoir

Weed can be an issue when the water levels are low on the south end and east side.

The rock wall side to the north / east and the steep bank side on the east, can still be fishable when the water levels are low.

Peir at Talbot Reservoir

The kids love watching redfin and trout chase the lure up, when fishing from the elevated wall or pier. (On sunny days you might even Polaroid a fish or two.)

When the lake has good water levels, there are dead trees and timber that is worth throwing a lure around. Or casting a bait or fly close to the weed beds, or near cover.

The south side is the shallow end and has Stony Creek running to it. When the water is low it can be muddy around the banks.

The little lake holds around 846 megalitres of water capacity when full.

 

What fish are in Talbot Reservoir?

Brown trout, rainbow trout are in the lake and redfin. It also contains roach and tench.

 

What fishing bait to use at Talbot Reservoir?

Mudeyes are effective under a float or quill drifted out or along the side the weed beds.

Scrubbies, earthworms, Powerbait and corn can be fished with a running sinker, or under a float if the wind direction is good.

On the east side, there are a lot of yabby holes in the mud, which is also a good bait to try.

Grasshoppers and crickets, on minimal weighted gear can be effective on warm nights.

 

What lures to use at Talbot Reservoir?

Brown trout caught at Talbot Reservoir on soft plastic lure.
Pictured above is a brown trout caught on a curly tail soft plastic grub.

Tassie Devil lures, wobblers, small diving minnows, soft plastics, bent minnows, small Rapala hard body lures, Celta and Mepps trout spinners can all work.

For the shallower south end, lighter weight spinners can be used if there is minimal weed, or if you can get over the weed beds.

 

Fly fishing at Talbot Reservoir

During the day, the standard black and brown nymphs and damsel fly nymph patterns, fished slowly are worth a try.

Smelt and mudeye patterns like: Black Muddler Minnows, Craig’s Night Time, Fuzzy Wuzzy, Woolly buggers, Alexandria and the fur fly can be fished at morning and evenings and during the night.  These flies can be worked around the weed beds and structure.

For warm evenings, beetle patterns are worth casting.

I haven’t seen any huge mayfly hatches, but you get the odd hatch and it can be exciting fly fishing. Dry flies like the red tag, midge, dun imitations and emerger patterns can be exciting fishing.

If there are no active fish feeding I will generally put on a bigger wet fly search pattern.

Some of the best flies to use fishing are ones you have confidence in them.

(I remember when the Tom Jones trout fly was the rage in the fly fishing world at one stage. It is a great fly and lots of fly fisherman caught fish with it. However, I never had any confidence in it, as a result I fished it less. Probably because of not fishing it much, I didn’t catch anything with it. I think I got a small redfin with it, but that was it. Moral of the story, fish the flies you have confidence in.)

Small water snails can be found in the lake, which the trout love feeding at times during winter.

 

How to get to Talbot Reservoir?

Talbot Reservoir sign at Evansford

Talbot Reservoir is just off the Clunes – Evansford Road about 1 km from Evansford.

You can access the lake two ways. The main entrance is at Clunes – Evansford Road.

The back entrance is just a little way further up, off the Clunes – Evansford Road and will bring you near the north side wall.

If you are travelling from Ballarat it is around 47 km away or a 37 minutes’ drive.

According to Google maps, to travel from Melbourne will take you about 2 hours’ drive, or about 158 km away.

Maryborough is only 23 minutes drive from the water.

From Geelong it is around 1 hour 45 minute drive.

For Bendigo anglers, it is about 1 hour 15 minutes to get there.

 

Isn’t Evansford Reservoir at Evansford, and Talbot Reservoir at Talbot?

To confuse people, (it confuses ne when I think about it) Talbot Reservoir isn’t at Talbot.

Talbot Reservoir is located at Evansford, not at Talbot.

The town Talbot is located around 14 km to the north from Evansford.

Evansford Reservoir is located south of the actual Evansford town and not as close to the town at Talbot Reservoir. (Years ago you could fish at Evansford Reservoir and it held some nice trout. But you are not allowed to fish it currently.)

 

What other fishing spots are close by?

If you have no luck fishing at Talbot Reservoir, or the conditions are bad, here are some other fishing spots to consider.

Tullaroop Reservoir is around 30 minutes’ drive away.

Cairn Curran is 47 minutes or 60 km.

Lake Wendouree, situated in Ballarat is about a 37 minute drive.

Close to Lake Wendouree are the Victoria Park Lakes. These two small lakes are great to take the kids fishing, or for beginners. They are stocked as part the Family Friendly Fishing Lakes program. For more information on fishing the lakes, click on – Fishing Victoria Park Lakes

Lake Learmonth, subject to low water levels is 20 minutes away.

Lake Burrumbeet is around 35 minutes’ drive.

Lake Esmond is another easy access place to take the children fishing and is about 40 minutes’ drive from Talbot Reservoir. This small, but deep lake gets stocked with rainbow trout. For more details, visit – Lake Esmond Fishing Guide

Newlyn Reservoir is about 40 minute drive from Talbot Reservoir.

 

Do you need a fishing licence to fish there?

You will need a Victorian Fishing Licence to fish there. Children under 18 years of age don’t need a licence.

Fishing permit sign for the lake.

(Many years ago you would also need a written permit from the water authority to fish in places like Dean Reservoir, Gong Gong and Talbot Reservoir. You still see it on the Central Highlands Water board signs and it is still mentioned on the VFA (Victorian Fisheries Authority.) website.)

 

What accommodation is close by to the lake?

There is the Clunes Caravan Park and also Maryborough Caravan Parks and hotel / motel accommodation in the bigger towns.

 

Who else uses the lake?

I have seen people in kayaks fishing the reservoir, but I am sure it isn’t allowed at this stage to put a canoe or kayak on the water there.

Apart from the occasionally bird watcher, it is only normally visited by anglers.

 

Amenities

There are no amenities at the lake. You cannot camp there.

 

Can you swim at Talbot Reservoir?

No, you can’t swim at the lake.

You are not meant to wade when fishing either.

 

What wildlife are there?

Cormorants, black ducks, teal, wood ducks, musk ducks and other water birds love the area.

I like when the swallows are flying about picking up insects off the water, as that can indicate food that might get the trout active.

Kangaroos frequent the area as well.

 

Summary

Talbot Reservoir brown trout.

Fishing at Talbot Reservoir is a nice relaxing way to spend a few hours, or the day without the crowds.

The lake can at times produce nice rainbow and brown trout. Redfin are also fun to catch for the kids.

If you flick a lure, cast a fly, bait fish or do all three, Talbot Reservoir is a great place to wet a line.

 

ock wall at Talbot Reservoir

Low water levels at Talbot Reservoir. Looking south from north side.

Above photograph was taken from the north side looking at south end. The water levels are low and you can see the weed on the right side (west).

Talbot Reservoir west side

Above image: West side of the lake to the right of the photo.

Below photo: Rainbow trout jumping out of water on fly rod.

Rainbow trout jumping out of water on fly rod

 

Below image: Small redfin caught on a soft plastic curly tail grub. While the small reddies can be annoying they are great fun for the kids fishing.

Redfin on curly tail grub soft plastics

 

Resources

Victorian Fisheries Authority